Yes They Slay: A Musical Revue Review

“I’m sorry, the old Social Media Chair can’t come to the phone right now.”

“Why?”

“Oh, ‘cause she’s dead!”

No, she’s not dead. Worse, she’s graduated and—even worse than that—working with children, which I personally consider a fate worse than death.

Nevertheless, the blog must go on! Thus, emerges the witty, wise, and weirdly into alliteration new Social Media Chair, who will be just like the last one, except funnier: David Novis.

 Photo by Larry Fried

Photo by Larry Fried

Who is me. I am David. I’ve been writing my intro this whole time (my ego is maniacal). Cat’s out of the bag^.

Well, hello! Coincidentally, I’m also the Assistant Director of If I Stay: A Musical Revue, which is actually supposed to be the focus of this post—rather than me rambling about myself for 1,000 words (which trust me I can do, but by word 750 it will get really introspective and sad and nobody actually wants that). So, instead, I’m going to do the thing and focus on the revue because also if I don’t Katie (Siegel) might fire me and I wasn’t planning to get canned until at least Ordinary Days.

 Photo by Paolo Arceo

Photo by Paolo Arceo

So, okay, what is If I Stay: A Musical Revue: A Rock Opera anyways? Heck, what is a revue to begin with? Well, lemme get all C+ 7th grade essay up in here and say that Webster’s defines a revue as “a light theatrical entertainment consisting of a series of short sketches, songs, and dances, typically dealing satirically with topical issues.” And, true to form, this revue does all of that! Sort of.

Because this is not just light and satirical—it’s also real and hard as h*ck.

“It tackles what a lot of college aged students, in our generation, feel. There’s the anxiety of songs like *** and songs that deal with homecoming and nostalgia like ***. There are a lot of deep messages in the show that are really important to the people of this generation,” explains Jonah Levinson, cast member.

 Photo by Paolo Arceo

Photo by Paolo Arceo

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “I’ve been back at Rutgers, like, a week now, maybe—and you expect me to go see some real hard-ass life shit? When I could just go out instead? And drown those kinds of feelings with copious amounts of alcohol, while at some uncomfortable frat house, until I’ve numbed myself from that harsh, bitter reality entirely?”

Yes.

Because it isn’t just all dark, serious life stuff! Well, it is—but there’s a silver lining!

“The show’s resolution is incredibly fulfilling—the realization that you’re never truly alone while experiencing these feelings, and on this journey that may seem so hopeless at times. It gives the show this, sort of, obscure, implicit optimism, serving as a reminder that everything will be okay in the end,” relates David Novis, Assistant Director (What? I’m a part of the production too. I can interview myself. It’s not against the law. Sue me, it’ll hold up, and I’ll win).

 Photo by Paolo Arceo

Photo by Paolo Arceo

Interested now, huh? But now I’m sure you’re thinking: “What are these ‘profound’ songs anyways? Will I even enjoy the music?”

Well, there’s a reason I edited out the song titles up in Jonah’s quote there—it’s a surprise

“It was kind of my first time hearing a lot these songs with instruments,” Levinson confesses.

What I can tell you is that it’s co-written by two of our fellow students, Ajit J. Mathews and Maya Mitterhoff, and comprises of 21 hyper-contemporary musical theater bops, bangers, dingers, dongers, and lushies (these are all positive synonyms for songs, I swear).

“The thing I like about the show is how all the songs are so uniquely different, yet they fit very well when it comes to the overlying theme,” says Jennifer Dars, cast member.

 Photo by Paolo Arceo

Photo by Paolo Arceo

And the best part of all of this is they sound REALLY good. Like, obnoxiously good. And look obnoxiously good too. It actually lowkey gets me angry there are only ~75 seats inside Cabaret and that everybody at Rutgers won’t be able to come in and watch them all be really obnoxiously really good.

 Photo by Paolo Arceo

Photo by Paolo Arceo

Rachel Spillane, cast member, put it much more elegantly, recalling how she felt just a few days ago as it began to come together,

“I walked in and all the lights were on the stage, and I was like, ‘Oh, wow, we have a show now. This is happening.' It hit me that we have this piece of art that we created; and all of a sudden it’s alive and well.”

 Photo by Paolo Arceo

Photo by Paolo Arceo

You hear that? Art. They’ve made art there and it is happening – this weekend. So, like, be there. Please. If none of this managed to incentivize you enough to come, let me leave you with this one last sentiment from Spillane:


“There’s a song for everyone—even if you relate to just a little piece of something.”

Something for everything! And everyone (logically) includes you, the reader, so, therefore, there’s something for you, and you should listen to the wise Spillane (or come to prove her wrong and tell her after the show how you didn’t find anything relatable, idk, we’ll already have your money by then so whatever, I guess).

(But I highly doubt that’ll happen…you know…I bet that it’s more likely you’ll…stay)

(Wow, that’s really how I’m going to close my first blog post, huh? Setting a low bar for this year aren’t I…)

^If somebody could explain this metaphor to me, I would really appreciate it because I’ve personally never understood it. Please email your explanation to drn35@scarletmail.rutgers.edu, thank you so much in advance.    

TICKETS FOR IF I STAY: A MUSICAL REVUE: http://sabo.tix.com/m/Schedule.aspx?OrgNum=4785&framed=true